Hot Tips

Water consumption is something most of us take for granted, assuming that the earth will always have an endless bounty of water for us to enjoy. However, water is a precious commodity and its important to value each drop we use to ensure our healthy hydrated future!

"3 T's of watering"

TEST the soil's moisture before watering a particular area.

TARGET directly at the root of the plants you are watering to avoid being wasteful.

TIME a sprinkler for no more than 30 minutes, helping to reduce use of excess water.

"Wash your car on the lawn instead of the street"

By parking your vehicle on the grass whilst you wash it, the water used will be absorbed by the lawn and not run from the street into our waterways. This helps keep rivers and harbour clean and healthy!

In the US alone, 100 million discarded plastic bags end up in the environment. They block drains and other waterways, entangle sea birds, choke marine animals and, as they disintegrate in the ocean, work their way into the food chain.

  • Buy reusable bags to take to the supermarket
  • Refuse plastic bags at shop counters
  • Recycle any supermarket bags you may have

By learning about the various methods by which different fish are caught, you can make informed choices to help prevent environmental damage caused by harmful methods such as bottom trawling and gill-netting.

Ocean 'Gyres' are networks of currents that move around the planet circulating water.

An ocean Gyre is formed from a web of currents influenced by wind and the rotation of earth.

The result is a slow-moving whirlpool system of water covering huge patches of ocean and capable of accumulating an immeasurable amount of rubbish.

Debris gets caught in the cycle and flows towards the centre of the spinning Gyre.

There are 5 major oceanic 'Gyres' in the world collecting decades of garbage from every corner of the globe.

Ocean Gyres may be far out at sea, but they are exposing the harsh realities of ocean pollution; and world pollution.

Please be aware of your consumption of disposable plastics and materials that will never degrade from our planet. The ocean cannot carry the weight of our waste forever.

The Amazon river basin and surrounding rain forest encompasses more than 1/3 of the entire world's wildlife.

The enormous tropical forest and 2nd longest river on the planet cover an area exceeding 5,400,000 km2!!

The Amazon's rain forest has the richest biodiversity, while the river system is home to over 2,100 fish species...with more being discovered every year!

Illegal gold mining and deforestation are two destructive practices threatening the Amazon. This vast area is home to numerous native communities that rely on their surrounding environment to survive.

A true wonder of the world, the Amazon rain forest and river basin require protection, restoration, and conservation action in order to withstand aggressive human exploitation.

Commonly known as the "Unicorn of the Sea", the Narwhal is a fascinating and unique resident of the Arctic waters around Canada and Greenland.

The Narwhal's unique appearance is due to a huge tusk, a second tooth, that grows out of the animal's top jaw. Reaching lengths of 2.5 meters and weighing up to 10 Kilograms, this 'unicorn' has no formal use and has never been seen as a fighting tools in males.

Perfectly adapted for life in the Arctic, Narwhals use echolocation to map our holes in the ice so they can reach the surface for a breath. Staying close to loose pack ice, Narwhals must be very precise in order to find enough breathing holes to survive.

Narwhals are still hunted by the Inuit people of Canada for their tusks and meat, and are especially vulnerable to the impacts of Climate Change on the Arctic environment.

The world's underwater sea beds have engrained resources such as oil hidden deep beneath the ocean floor. Drilling for this oil has become a widespread and incredibly profitable business for industries seeking to utilize this natural resource. A multitude of products humans use have been sourced from the crude oil found deep in our sea beds.

On April 20th, 2010, an explosion aboard the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig caused the largest ocean oil spill in history in the Gulf of Mexico. An estimated 50,000 barrels of oil escaped into the ocean every day for a total of 87 days until the leak was finally stopped.

The environmental damage for this type of incident is immeasurable and will continue to escalate for years to come. Wildlife and fishing communities depending on the Gulf of Mexico's nutrient rich waters have been heavily affected by the inundation of oil since the disastrous spill.

There are numerous offshore drilling rigs around the globe extracting oil from as deep as 1 mile beneath the ocean floor. The environmental consequences of incidental oil spills are monumental and bring into question the sustainability of this type of industry.

Fishy Facts...

Today, there are over 3 million vessels fishing our oceans.

Some of the biggest ships called "Supertrawlers" can be the length of a football field and fit 12 planes onto their deck.

The "Supertrawler" catches 10 tons of fish per hour!!!

The Global Fisheries industry is spending more time, money, and effort on the ocean, and fishing harder than ever before...

This is seriously threatening entire populations of fish that have roamed the earth for hundreds of millions of years.

Since World War II, the Industrialization and Globalization of our societies, governments, and economies have generated what is now called the "throwaway" culture.

Over 1,500,000,000 Kilograms of plastic is produced every year around the world. Nearly half of that ends up in our living oceans.

Please be aware of your use of 'disposable' plastics, and take a moment to consider the permanent implications of buying, consuming, and throwing away a lifetime of plastic.

The planet is yours, be proud to protect it.

What inspires you?

"I believe we all have a moral obligation to defend our eco-systems from diminishment and destruction and that we owe future generations the right to a healthy and diverse environment. We have no right to rob them of the rich treasures that this planet contains just to satisfy our selfish material desires. What inspires me is the beauty and the magnificence of Planet Earth and especially our oceans"

-Sea Shepherd Conservation founder Paul Watson

The Grey Nurse Shark, also known as the sand tiger shark and the spotted ragged-tooth shark was the first shark in the world to be protected.

Listed as vulnerable in some countries, the Grey nurse shark is critically endangered in eastern Australia in part because of destructive shark-netting programs.

Grey nurse sharks may look threatening, but they are placid and slow-moving animals capable of beautiful interactions with humans.

Due to their late reproductive maturity and birth rates of only 2 pups every 2 years, Grey Nurse sharks are especially vulnerable to extinction. So let's help to protect these incredible animals!

The mighty white bear from the north is well and truly feeling the pressure of Global Warming.

Polar bears are among the most threatened species feeling the harsh impacts of climate change on their native environment.

Born deaf and without sight, Polar bears grow to be the most powerful predator on earth. With an incredible sense of smell, adult bears spend most of their lives alone in search of food.

Using frozen ice to travel and hunt seals, walruses, and even whales, Polar bears are now using their swimming skills more than ever before. A tagged female was recently recorded swimming over 600 kilometers of icy Arctic water looking for food...and solid ground.

Climate change is and will affect everyone, so get educated about how you can help appease some of the destructive impacts on our global environment ♥

Holding the title for 'fattest animal in the world' , the Bowhead whale has up to 50 tons of blubber helping to keep it warm at home in the Arctic. It is also known as the "Arctic whale" or "Greenland right whale".

Some studies have suggested the Bowhead whale can live up to 200 years! They are quite possibly the oldest living mammal on earth...and they also have the largest mouth of any animal!

What a record breaker!!

The Sperm whale is not only the largest of toothed whale, reaching an incredible 20 meters, but it also has the largest brain of ANY living animal!

Diving up to 3,000 meters in search of its favorite prey the Giant or Colossal Squid, the Sperm whale uses Echolocation to hunt. This whale's 'clicking' sounds, done by blowing our air, are the loudest vocalization of any specie.

The name 'Sperm whale' is derived from 'Spermaceti', the milky-waxy substance found in this whale's head. History saw the Sperm whale hunted for its 'spermaceti', and today this whale is listed as "Vulnerable" by the IUCN.

A huge portion of our planet's land mass is being used for agriculture, with a staggering 70% occupied for Livestock production.

Suprisingly, 18% of our Carbon emissions are caused by livestock activities, fuel intensive farming practices, and deforestation.

In the last 150 years, human activites have cause CO2 levels to skyrocket and our earth's entire climate to warm.

Global warming and Climate change affects each and every one of you; lets do our part in restoring balance to our environment!

The all mighty whale!!

Humans and whales have significant biological similarities bonding them in the group of mammals. We nourish our young with milk we produce naturally, breathe oxygen through a set of lungs and are warm-blooded.

Although whales are thought to have evolved partly from terrestrial ancestry, they have adapted to life underwater, capable of absorbing more oxygen than mammals on earth.

Along their journeys in the ocean, whales may go without sleep for up to 3 months, without food for 8 months, and wait as long as 2 hours between surface breaths!

Let's protect whales!! ♥



The commercial fishing technique of 'longlining' is the predominant threat to many Albatross species worldwide.

Studies have shown that nearly 100,000 Albatross are killed every year due to long lines.

Extending for miles with hundreds or thousands of baited hooks, the fishy long lines attract Albatross, who become easily entangled and drown after attempting to feed on the bait.

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) sates that 19 out of the 21 species of Albatross around the world are now threatened.

Long line fishing is a method by which a main line is set out with multiple baited "branches" or "snoods". This commercial fishing technique is prone to cause the 'incidental' deaths of sea birds, turtles, and sharks.

Releasing one line near the surface or on the sea bed with hundreds of baited hooks is used worldwide to target Swordfish, Tuna, Halibut, and Sablefish.

Fisheries in some areas are using thousands of hand baited hooks to draw in maximum catches. In the North-Pacific some fishing fleets are known to use 2,500 hooks on a single line extending many miles!!

As multiple sea animals are attracted to the bait on long lines, they become entangled in the line to often drown. Long line fishing is responsible for multiple ocean species becoming endangered due to the excessive by-catch ratio of this fishing method.


The Great Barrier Reef, found in the Coral Sea off the north-east coast of Australia, is one of the world's largest protected marine reserves. As the state icon of Queensland, this reef shines as the largest structure built by tiny and amazing Coral Polyps.

The Great Barrier Reef can be seen from outer space, and since be awarded a 'World Heritage Site' listing in 1981, tourism surrounding the reef has generated upwards of $1 Billion a year.

Composed of 2,999 unique reefs, and 900 islands spread over 2,600 Kilometers, a countless amount of wildlife call the reef home.

Some threats to the reef are over-fishing, coral bleaching, and outbreaks of Crown of thorns starfish. Climate change is also a formidable cause for concern.

The largest animal to have ever lived on our planet is none other than the Blue Whale.

These Baleen whales grow up to 30 meters in length, and weigh up to 200 tons!! Its tongue alone can weigh 3 tons, and a newborn calf is as heavy as an adult Hippopotamus!

Scientists estimate Blue Whales can live for up to 80 years, although they are still vulnerable to climate change, vessel strikes, and their only known predator, the Orca.

Surviving a near extinction during the 19th century, Blue Whales have since been recovering, with populations estimated at more than 12,000.

Grey Whales are worldwide travellers, embarking on the longest migrations of any known mammal.

They move between masses of ocean terrain for their annual summer feeding and winter breeding periods, stretching their journey from the Arctic to Mexico and back!

Part of the Baleen Whale family, Grey Whales filter the sea floor with the help of 'plates', looking for small Crustaceans and worms.

Of the two known populations, Grey Whales in the North-Western Pacific are CRITICALLY ENDANGERED, compared to their healthier counterparts in the Eastern North Pacific.

Beluga Whales, also known as "White Whales" live in the arctic and sub-arctic waters of the world.

They live in pods of hundreds, and even thousands of individuals, and their 'clicks', 'squeaks', and 'chips' are among the most distinctive of any mammal, earning them the nickname of "Sea Canary".

Living in the some of the coldest oceans, Belugas have a 10 centimeter thick layer of blubber insulating their bodies. In fact, half of their weight is FAT!

Before coal and oil industries were created, the ocean's acidity had remained stable for 20 million years.

Over the past 250 years, the ocean has absorbed 530 billion tons of C02, which has in turn resulted in acidity levels in the ocean to rise by 30 % !

We have the ocean to thank for slowing down the effects of Carbon emissions in the atmosphere, as she absorbs nearly 1/2 of all fossil fuels released into the air.



The underwater gardens of our oceans, CORAL REEFS, are living organisms providing a home for nearly 1/2 the fish humans consume.

However, due to human's vast exploitation of the ocean environment and problems such as Global Warming, Coastal Development, Bottom Trawling, and pollution, 20% of the worlds Coral Reefs are dead.

Given the likelihood of ocean exploitation to continue, another 15% of living Coral Reefs could dissapear within 20 years.

This will affect humans in more ways than we realize...

Orcas, often referred to as "Killer Whales", are actually the largest of the DOLPHIN family.

Orcas are found in every ocean of the world, making them the most widely distributed animal.

Not only do Orcas dominate the underwater world, they are also the FASTEST sea mammal, capable of reaching swimming speeds of 55kph!

Every year, dogs, bees, lightning, and lions kill more people than sharks.

In reality, sharks are a heavily endangered species...

For every attack on a human, it is estimated nearly 10 million sharks are killed by us.

Vampire Power accounts for wasted energy costs of up to $3.5 billion a year!

So what is it???

Vampire power is the energy expended by home electronics when they are not in use. The most common appliances sucking power are audio equipment, DVD players, and cordless phones.

Current estimates reveal that vampire power energy in the U.S. is equivilent to 5 nuclear power plants!!

Manage your energy consumption easily by plugging in your appliances only when you are ready to use them!

Nearly 1/3 of the fish life caught each year is considered BY-CATCH and thus discarded by the fishermen.

Fishing boats kill and dispose of life they have stripped of the ocean, simply because they catch species that are not as profitable as others.

What about the value of life...?


According to NASA, 1/2 of the Oxygen we breathe on a daily basis comes from the synthesis of marine plants.

Trillions of Phytoplankton work together to convert huge amounts of C02 into living matter.

During this process, they produce oxygen for the planet and help regulate its overall climate.

Thank you ocean!!

Green Sea Turtles are the only herbivorous air breathing reptile in the sea!

Due to their exclusive diet of sea grass and algae, their green flesh and shell make them a popular source of food and leather goods.

It takes up to 20 years for a green sea turtle to reproduce, making them very sensitve to exploitation.

They are now listed as an endangered species worldwide.

A staggering 500 Billion to 1 Trillion plastic bags are consumed around the world each year!

We all know plasitc is not biodegradable, and actually takes up to 1,000 years to break down

...but will never dissapear from this planet.

The Great white shark

This fear-inducing fish, the eternal poster shark for the "Jaws" fuelled anti-shark sentiment, the powerful Great white, also known as the 'White shark' is the ocean's top predator.

The White shark is also the largest of predatory fish, growing to lengths of over 6 meters (20 feet).

This shark is found in every ocean on the planet, and can adapt to sub-tropical and temperate waters alike. These sharks are the most feared of all shark species, and their jagged, exposed, multiple rows of teeth are certainly their most threatening feature.

Great whites have about 300 teeth at any given time, while back rows continually develop new teeth to replace ones lost over time.  These sharks predate huge mammals such as seals, and they need strong jaws and sharp teeth to consume such large prey! 

Despite the widely held belief White sharks are 'man-eating machines' and 'monsters of the sea', they are actually vulnerable, ancient, vital marine creatures, and deserve the respect of man. 

 


 

Known for 'basking' in the sun, this friendly shark is the second largest after the Whale shark.

Basking Sharks are impressive migrators, historically found in all of our ocean's temperate zones.  Although fished aggressively in past centuries, today the Basking shark is most commonly found in the waters off New Zealand, Canada and Ireland. 

Like his cousin the Whale shark, the Basking shark is a filter feeder, relying on Zooplankton and small Invertebrates as its main source of nutrition.

Reaching sizes of up to 10 meters, these sharks are gentle giants, known to swim slowly and near the surface of the water. Characterized by their docile nature, Basking sharks are an easy fishing target, and they are still hunted for their flesh, fins, and the gallons of oil produced by their livers.

Basking sharks equipped with research tags have proved to scientists they can swim across oceans and cross equators along their journeys. They have also been seen breaching and swimming nose to tail in what is thought to indicate mating behavior.  

With fewer than 8,000 female Basking sharks left in our oceans, scientists are hurriedly trying to learn more about these mysterious creatures.  Some believe they could become indicators of climate change given they are constantly following, searching for, or feeding on a great indicator of eco-system health, Zooplankton.    

 

 

How far did the food you eat travel to get to your plate?

The average journey our food takes to arrive at the point of consumption is between 1,500 and 2,500 miles.

From its origin, food now travels 25% farther compared to 30 years ago. It takes LOADS of energy and refrigeration to transport food, not to mention the TIME your food has spent from being harvested to reaching your plate...

Eat fresh!! Support local farmers, and help your community and planet thrive.





Did you know?

Before coal and oil industries were created, the ocean's acidity had remained stable for 20 million years.

Over the past 250 years, the ocean has absorbed 530 billion tons of C02, which has in turn resulted in acidity levels in the ocean to rise by 30 % !

We have the ocean to thank for slowing down the effects of Carbon emissions in the atmosphere, as she absorbs nearly 1/2 of all fossil fuels released into the air.



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